2021 sustainability report

HR management
and social
partnership

HR management

Our human capital is the basis of our success. With this in mind, Nornickel seeks to create an attractive employee value proposition to help its people fully develop their potential and boost the shared sense of engagement towards achieving the Company’s goals.

The Company leverages digital tools to monitor HR metrics on a regular basis, including staff costs, productivity levels, impacts of its social and adaptation programmes, and employee engagement survey results, make effective HR decisions and assess management effectiveness.

HR management responsibilities are allocated among Nornickel’s various governance bodies and business units in line with their terms of reference.

Key HR management priorities:

  • Building a skilled and balanced team;
  • Staff training and development;
  • Improving productivity and efficiency;
  • Creating a talent pool;
  • Enhancing our incentive system;
  • Implementing our social policy.

Nornickel’s key HR management regulations*:

  • Principles and provisions of the international law, standards of the International Labour Organisation, national laws of the countries of operation
  • Constitution and the Labour Code of the Russian Federation
  • Equal Opportunities Programme
  • Freedom of Association Policy
  • Working Conditions Policy
  • Personal Data Processing Policy
  • Talent Pool Regulation
  • Procedure for Assessing Employee Performance.

Staff composition

GRI 403-1

In 2021, the Group’s average headcount was 73,557 employees, of which 99% were employed at its Russian companies. A 1.7% growth in the average headcount across the Russian operations in 2021 was driven by the investment programme, as well organisational and technical changes.

The headcoun2 of the Group’s Russian operations as at the year-end stood at 76,626 employees, with most of them working full time (>99%) and on permanent contracts (>95%). As at the end of 2021, there were 1,129 employees working under civil contracts.

GRI 102-26

Governance body
Responsibilities

Governance body

Board of Directors

Responsibilities

  • Approving key HR policies

Governance body

Corporate Governance, Nomination and Remuneration Committee of the Board of Directors

Responsibilities

  • Considering HR management priorities and key internal regulations
  • Reviewing matters related to human capital development

Governance body

Senior Vice President for HR, Social Policy and Public Relations

Responsibilities

  • Overseeing and coordinating the development and implementation of the HR strategy

Governance body

HR Department

Responsibilities

  • Developing and implementing the HR strategy
  • Taking part in the development and implementation of the Company’s social policy

Governance body

Social Policy Department

Responsibilities

  • Developing and implementing the social policy, social and charitable programmes

Governance body

HR functions of the Group companies

Responsibilities

  • Implementing HR and social policies at Group companies

Governance body

Corporate Trust Line, offices for operational, social and labour relations

Responsibilities

  • Registering complaints and queries related to employee rights
Group personnel structure by territory*, %
Headcount of the Group's foreign operations, individuals
Personnel structure by education, %

Group personnel structure by territory*, %

Group personnel structure by territory

Headcount of the Group's foreign operations, individuals

Headcount of the Group's foreign operations, individuals

Personnel structure by education, %

Personnel structure by education, %

Personnel structure by gender and category in 2017–2021*

Category
Managers
White-collar employees
Blue-collar employees
Year/gender
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female

Year/gender

2017

Managers

Male

8,200

Female

2,559

White-collar employees

Male

5,846

Female

7,024

Blue-collar employees

Male

42,562

Female

11,799

Year/gender

2018

Managers

Male

8,017

Female

2,639

White-collar employees

Male

6,047

Female

6,911

Blue-collar employees

Male

40,502

Female

10,810

Year/gender

2019

Managers

Male

7,979

Female

2,518

White-collar employees

Male

6,189

Female

6,940

Blue-collar employees

Male

38,842

Female

10,314

Year/gender

2020

Managers

Male

8,117

Female

2,575

White-collar employees

Male

6,436

Female

7,043

Blue-collar employees

Male

37,352

Female

9,925

Year/gender

2021

Managers

Male

8,489

Female

2,708

White-collar employees

Male

6,839

Female

7,794

Blue-collar employees

Male

37,327

Female

9,904

Personnel structure by gender and age, %

Age
Under 30
30–50
Over 50
Gender
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female

Gender

% of headcount

Under 30

Male

11.3

Female

3.9

30–50

Male

46.0

Female

20.0

Over 50

Male

13.0

Female

5.7

Key personnel turnover indicators*

GRI 401-1

Indicator
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021

Indicator

Employments

2017

11,262

2018

14,901

2019

13,805

2020

10,481

2021

17,642

Indicator

Employee inflow ratio*, %

2017

14.6

2018

19.9

2019

18.8

2020

14.2

2021

23.1

Indicator

Resignations and dismissals

2017

15,232

2018

16,918

2019

13,832

2020

10,247

2021

14,811

Indicator

Employee turnover*, %

2017

10.3

2018

10.2

2019

10.5

2020

9.7

2021

12.2

Indicator

Voluntary turnove*, %

2017

7.7

2018

7.5

2019

8.2

2020

7.8

2021

10.5

Indicator

Employee outflow ratio*, %

2017

20.0

2018

22.6

2019

18.8

2020

13.9

2021

19.4

The Company as a major employer in the Norilsk Industrial District and the Kola Peninsula realises that it is responsible for its impact on these regions’ labour markets. In hiring personnel, we assess all candidates based on their work experience, qualifications, and education.

As the Company is currently going through an active phase of its investment projects and organisational transformations, the number of new hires and dismissals in 2021 increased, both as a result of additional recruitment for full-time and part-time positions and due to staff transfers within the Group.

GRI 202-2

The share of top executives from among local communities was 99.4% across the Group’s Russian companies in 2021.

The share of employees from among local communities* was 99.8% across the Group’s companies in 2021.

Strong employer brand

In 2021, we retained leadership in key Russian and international rankings of the best employers:

  • best employer in the metals and mining industry among students, graduates and international rating experts according to Universum and Randstad Award;
  • best employer in the metals and mining industry among students of leading universities, according to Best Company Award, and 2nd place in the Power of Growth category for the steady increase in business students’ interest in the Company;
  • Best Metals Industry Employer, and 14th position in the Best Employers among Their Target Audience category in Future Today’s ranking, which takes into account the «opinions of Russian university students”;
  • 16th place among the largest companies in the national employer rating by HeadHunter and RBC out of more than 600 participating companies;
  • silver prize by Forbes in its best employers rating (Top 50 out of 104 participating companies), gold prize in the Employees and Society category, and platinum prize in the Corporate Governance category.

Commitment to employee rights

Nornickel respects employee rights and takes them into account in its operations.

At the same time, we provide our employees with equal opportunities to develop their professional potential. Employee performance is evaluated on a fair and impartial basis, and recruitment and promotion decisions are tied exclusively to professional abilities, knowledge, and skills.

The Company implements programmes for the development and social support of its employees, upholding their rights in respect of social security, education, family welfare, shelter, freedom of artistic expression, and participation in cultural life.

Employment of people with disabilities

The Company has created workplaces tailored for people with disabilities. According the employment quotas that vary depending on the region and company size, the share of such employees starts from 2% of the average headcount, excluding employees involved in harsh, hazardous and/or dangerous work.

We provide necessary working conditions, including work and rest schedule, annual and additional paid leaves, and additional financial assistance for this category of employees.

The Company has adopted internal labour regulations, which are approved in consultation with the trade union organisation and which establish working hours of employees. The Company has a standard working week of 40 hours as determined by the applicable Russian laws and regulations. Employees involved in hazardous and/or dangerous work enjoy a reduced working week of not more than 36 hours. Women employed in the Far North and equivalent areas are accorded 36 hours of work per week unless reduced by Russian laws and regulations. The Company arranges for accurate time and attendance control for each employee.

The Company strictly complies with the applicable regulations prohibiting women’s exposure to harsh and dangerous work in the mining industry. Zero tolerance towards child labour in any form, including the involvement of minors below 18 in hazardous and/or dangerous work is of equal importance.

The Company seeks to maintain an open dialogue with employees and to offer everyone an opportunity to be heard. In 2021, in addition to the Corporate Trust Line, the Company had offices for operating, social and labour relations in place. They are primarily tasked with response to employee queries, control of their processing, prompt resolution of conflicts and preventing violations of employee rights. The offices regularly monitor the climate within the teams, enabling the Company to address any arising issues in a timely manner.

In 2021, the Group companies operating in the Norilsk Industrial District ran 25 offices that received over 64,000 queries from employees (81%), former employees (18%), and local communities (1%). They focused on social and working matters (82%), legal matters (15%) and other topics (3%).

Social partnership framework

In order to develop interregional social partnerships, Interregional Cross- Industry Association of Employers «Union of Copper and Nickel Producers and Their Supporting Industries” and the Trade Union of MMC Norilsk Nickel Employees signed an interregional crossindustry agreement for copper and nickel producers and their supporting industries for 2019–2022. The agreement regulates social and labour relations between the employers who are members of the association and their employees and sets out common approaches to employee remuneration, compensation and benefits, work and rest schedule, health and safety, dismissals and other matters. In December 2021, the parties to the Agreement entered into an addendum to extend it to 2022–2025 and to amend it.

As at the end of 2021, the agreement applied to 22 Group companies, including MMC Norilsk Nickel, covering 89% of the Group employees.

The Company has a system of social partnership in place at its sites to align the interests of employees and employers in terms of the regulation of social and labour relations. The Company performs its obligations in compliance with the Labour Code of the Russian Federation, collective bargaining agreements, the interregional crossindustry agreement for copper and nickel producers and their supporting industries for 2019–2022, and joint resolutions. We also follow the Freedom of Association Policy approved by the Board of Directors.

The interests of the Group’s employees may be represented through various mechanisms, depending on the level:

  • in labour relations, employee interests are represented by social and labour councils and trade unions;
  • social and labour councils represent the interests of employees at all of the Group’s major operations in the Norilsk Industrial District and Murmansk Region. Chairs of the local councils make up the Social and Labour Council of MMC Norilsk Nickel and the Social and Labour Council of Kola MMC;
  • the Group companies have collective decision-making bodies representing the employer, employees and trade unions, including collective bargaining commissions, labour dispute commissions, social benefits commissions, social insurance commissions, health and safety commissions, social and labour relations commissions, etc.;
  • the Trade Union of MMC Norilsk Nickel Employees, an interregional public organisation that includes territorial trade unions and trade unions of the Group companies, represents the Group’s employee interests on the interregional level. The trade unions of transport and logistics divisions are members of the Yenisey Basin Trade Union of Water Transport Workers (Krasnoyarsk, Russia).

GRI 102-41

The Group companies are parties to 23 collective bargaining agreements covering 94% of the Group’s headcount. As at the end of 2021, 7.61% of all the Group’s employees were members of trade unions, while 77.19% were represented by social and labour councils.

GRI 402-1

As per the Labour Code of the Russian Federation, Nornickel notifies employees regarding significant changes in the Company’s activities. The minimum notice period — at least two months prior to the start of such changes or three months prior to the start of such changes in case the redundancy decision may lead to large-scale dismissals. These standards are formalised in collective bargaining agreements.

GRI ММ4/ SASB EM-MM-310a.2

The absence of strikes and lockouts involving the Company’s personnel in the reporting year testifies to the effectiveness of Nornickel’s employee interactions and its social policy at large.

Incentives and rewards

To motivate our employees to enhance their productivity and deliver business growth as well as to retain our highly qualified specialists, Nornickel runs a comprehensive employee incentive programme with both financial and non-financial rewards.

The use of financial rewards is governed by the Company’s remuneration policy.

The Company prohibits any discrimination in terms of setting and changing wages based on gender, age, race, nationality, origin, or religion.

Nornickel’s grading system is designed to maximise its return on investment in human capital and to attract, engage and retain top talent. Grading relies on the point factor method of job evaluation that takes into account knowledge and skills, the complexity of tasks, and the level of responsibility.

Remuneration policy goals
Remuneration policy principles

Remuneration policy goals

  • Attract and engage talent
  • Retain talent
  • Promote a productivity mindset

Remuneration policy principles

  • Internal equity — remuneration management is based on job description and evaluation in line with the existing grading system. Nornickel uses a uniform grading system covering all positions in the Company.
  • External competitiveness — remuneration is set in line with the labour market data adjusted for the company’s area of activity and location and depending on the job grade.
  • Performance-based incentives — pay level is reviewed subject to the annual performance assessment outcome.
  • Simplicity of the remuneration system — pay level calculation and review procedures are transparent, and every employee knows how to improve their remuneration.

In 2021, we continued our efforts to transform the bonus system for PMO staff. The updated incentive system based on key project indicators is aimed to motivate and retain key talent until the project is completed.

Also, in 2021 we introduced a unified policy on annual bonus rates. In line with the policy, the annual bonus depends on the employee’s grade. This approach enabled us to improve the transparency of our remuneration framework.

Key compensation indicators in 2021, by region

GRI 202-1

Region
Remuneration package, RUB ‘000
Average monthly salary, RUB ‘000
Share of regional payroll in total payroll, %
Minimum monthly compensation to statutory minimum monthly wage*
Statutory minimum wage, RUB

Group average

Remuneration package, RUB ‘000

158.0

Average monthly salary, RUB ‘000

145.1

Share of regional payroll in total payroll, %

100.0

Minimum monthly compensation to statutory minimum monthly wage*

Statutory minimum wage, RUB

Norilsk Industrial District (NID)

Remuneration package, RUB ‘000

156.1

Average monthly salary, RUB ‘000

142.8

Share of regional payroll in total payroll, %

65.6

Minimum monthly compensation to statutory minimum monthly wage*

1.0

Statutory minimum wage, RUB

33,259

Kola Peninsula Industrial District (Murmansk Region)

Remuneration package, RUB ‘000

117.2

Average monthly salary, RUB ‘000

103.7

Share of regional payroll in total payroll, %

11.4

Minimum monthly compensation to statutory minimum monthly wage*

1.0

Statutory minimum wage, RUB

29,422

Krasnoyarsk Territory (excluding NID)

Remuneration package, RUB ‘000

93.9

Average monthly salary, RUB ‘000

90.3

Share of regional payroll in total payroll, %

3.5

Minimum monthly compensation to statutory minimum monthly wage*

1.0

Statutory minimum wage, RUB

20,468

Trans-Baikal Territory*

Remuneration package, RUB ‘000

137.0

Average monthly salary, RUB ‘000

130.0

Share of regional payroll in total payroll, %

3.3

Minimum monthly compensation to statutory minimum monthly wage*

2.11

Statutory minimum wage, RUB

19,188

Moscow and other regions*

Remuneration package, RUB ‘000

310.2

Average monthly salary, RUB ‘000

291.9

Share of regional payroll in total payroll, %

16.2

Minimum monthly compensation to statutory minimum monthly wage*

2.55

Statutory minimum wage, RUB

20,589

Remuneration package across the Group's Russian operations in 2021, %

Remuneration package across the Group's Russian operations in 2021

Corporate culture development

To create a more positive environment for employees, as part of its human resource strategy, Nornickel seeks to develop its corporate culture with a focus on improving efficiency, accountability and employee engagement.

Training for management teams in corporate culture

In 2021, we focused on two management development programmes: Engagement Workshops (10 workshops, more than 40 training sessions) and Corporate Culture Workshop (33 workshops at 25 sites). This improved engagement and involvement of management teams in the corporate culture development programmes.

Engagement

As part of its efforts to boost employee integration, Nornickel annually runs a series of activities, which comprises three major stages:

  • conducting a survey named “Let Everyone Be Heard. What Do You Think?”;
  • analysing the results of the survey;
  • developing and implementing solutions based on the survey results.

Following the 2021 survey, the engagement index increased by 2 p.p. y-o-y to 56%, including in the following areas:

  • conditions for effective work (+4 p.p.);
  • improved workplace amenities, equipment upgrades and repairs had a positive impact on this factor;
  • remuneration and recognition (+2 p.p.);
  • salary satisfaction (+5 p.p. over the year);
  • career opportunities (+4 p.p.)

Besides, perceptions of senior management are not under risk any more for the first time in four years, and environmental perceptions are gradually improving despite incidents.

The study includes surveys and focus groups. In 2021, 46,800 employees took part in the survey, a 10% increase y-o-y.

Its results are subject to review, with corrective actions planned and implemented at all governance levels — from facilities to the Group as a whole.

Adoption of the Business Ethics Code

On 18 December 2020, the Board of Directors approved the new version of MMC Norilsk Nickel’s Business Ethics Code.

To ensure that employees understand and accept the principles and fundamentals of the Business Ethics Code, the Company held a series of training programmes for employees explaining the Code (a training module on the Code was integrated into Our Values programme, Nornikel Live, and Corporate Dialogues). In 2021, the programmes covered 45,000 employees.

Nickelisation

In 2021, Nornickel-SSC launched Nickelisation, its own gamification system. The platform is designed to bring employees together in a remote working environment, help create a single big team and promote the Company’s corporate culture by fostering its values, popularising the roles of mentors and internal coaches, and developing a feedback culture.

Since the launch of the platform, employees have said thank you to colleagues for their interaction and assistance more than 28,000 times, earned over 65,000 nickels (in-game currency) and purchased over 700 gifts with them. Thanks to the launch of the Good Deeds section, employees can now send nickels to charities, while also sharing their volunteering experience and inspiring their colleagues for charitable activities.

Personnel training and development

To deliver on ambitious goals, meet new technology requirements, and upgrade production, we pay special attention to developing expertise and competencies of our employees. The Company helps people become top professionals in their field.

Our training programmes cover all functional areas and all employee categories.

Personnel training

GRI 404-2

We provide extensive professional training opportunities to our employees emphasising the use of modern technology. Digital competencies have become a key focus of training.

More than 24,000 employees are active users of the Nornickel Academy corporate educational platform, taking advantage of new online learning opportunities.

The Nornickel Academy platform offers free access to more than 150 courses. The catalogue includes courses in the following areas:

  • The Company and Myself;
  • Professional Development;
  • Personal Development;
  • Management of People and Processes.

The most popular courses in 2021 were those developing managerial and digital competencies, specialisation courses, mandatory courses, and coaching. In 2021, we developed an educational course named Fundamentals of Non- Ferrous Metallurgy for non-core staff of the Company, which attracted more than 700 employees.

The Company pays special attention to developing the digital skills and literacy of employees. The objective of Digital Nornickel, a multi-level educational programme focusing on digitalisation, is to offer all employees an opportunity to learn the technology and skills required to work in a modern digital production environment and live in a digital environment.

The Digital Literacy course developed as part of the Digital Nornickel training programme yielded impressive results. The educational project seeks to explain what digital solutions, technologies, and tools are available on the market today, what Nornickel has in place, and what everyone can leverage in their work.

As at the end of 2021, 46,700 people completed the training course.

Key personnel training indicators

GRI 404-1

Indicator
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021

Indicator

Total training man-sessions, including training, retraining and skill improvement, thousand

2017

95.0

2018

87.5

2019

90.8

2020

70.9

2021

115

Indicator

incl. blue-collar employees

2017

54

2018

43.3

2019

40.5

2020

30.6

2021

50

Indicator

incl. managers

2017

26

2018

27.4

2019

30.9

2020

23.2

2021

36

Indicator

incl. white-collar employees

2017

15

2018

16.8

2019

19.4

2020

17.1

2021

29

Indicator

Employees trained, thousand

2017

46.3

2018

44.0

2019

40.4

2020

36.7

2021

51

Indicator

Total training man-hours, thousand

2017

6,630

2018

4,508.7

2019

4,655.9

2020

3,462.2

2021

5,000

Indicator

Average annual training hours per employee trained

2017

70

2018

51.6

2019

51.3

2020

48.8

2021

43.7

Indicator

Average annual training hours per employee (based on average headcount)

2017

85

2018

60.2

2019

64.0

2020

48.5

2021

69.2

Indicator

incl. blue-collar employees

2017

95

2018

62.2

2019

69.2

2020

48.3

2021

69.5

Indicator

incl. managers

2017

83

2018

76.7

2019

72.5

2020

64.0

2021

96.9

Indicator

incl. white-collar employees

2017

44

2018

38.7

2019

37.5

2020

36.8

2021

47.3

Indicator

Training costs, RUB mln

2017

896

2018

1,022.2

2019

1,101.9

2020

740.2

2021

952

Indicator

Costs per employee trained, RUB

2017

9,459

2018

11,687

2019

12,133

2020

10,440

2021

18,272

Management development

We continue to lay special stress on developing management competencies and enhancing management skills. Corporate training programmes focus on the following categories of employees:

  • Top 100;
  • middle management;
  • managers at all levels;
  • line managers.

Top 100

In 2021, we implemented the corporate development programme for the Top 100 and high-potential managers identified by HR committees in a mixed format. The training was completed by 22 managers. The programme relies on the project methodology, whereby participants get involved in designing real growth projects in certain areas of the Company’s operations.

Middle management

Pursuing Efficiency

The Pursuing Efficiency programme is a bright example of introducing a e-learning culture. Traditionally, it comprises five modules that develop the management competencies of middle managers:

  • Result-oriented Management (“Manage!”);
  • Productivity (“Improve!”);
  • Effective Communications (“Negotiate!”);
  • Financial Management (“Analyse!”);
  • Team Management (“Interact!”).

In 2021, the programme was adapted to the online format based on the Learning Journey principles. This is a mixed multiformat workplace learning concept that moves the learner along a trajectory of acquiring skill to the point of conscious competence. A particular feature of the programme is the transformation of middle managers’ online behaviour: they develop the habit of acquiring knowledge in a digital environment and interacting with each other. For many participants, this transformation has meant a dramatic change in their attitude — from passive online listeners to active doers.

Managers at all levels

360-Degree Management

In 2021, the managers who had undergone a 360-degree competency review continued the 360-Degree Management online programme which focuses on enhancing corporate and management competencies. Participants selected their topics on their own, taking into account the review results and targets set out in their individual development plans. Training covered six topics:

  • team interaction;
  • execution management;
  • development of corporate competencies;
  • communications;
  • systems thinking;
  • partnerships.

A total of 139 managers from divisions, subsidiaries and the Head Office completed the training.

In 2021, the Company launched School of Foreman, a new learning programme for line managers in production (foremen), which saw 72 foremen trained. According to feedback, the participants rated the programme with a high score of 9.6 out of 10.

Vocational training for production personnel

The Company places strong emphasis on establishing a modern learning environment by creating technological learning spaces. For example, a new innovative training centre in Talnakh will be completed by the end of 2024. The new building will meet all modern requirements for training the Company’s employees using digital technologies. The centre will feature a fleet of simulators to develop hands-on skills. To raise the competencies of our employees, the Company has an underground training base at Kayerkansky Mine for developing practical skills of operators of long-hauldump vehicles (LHD), underground selfpropelled machines and self-propelled drilling rigs.

A building in Monchegorsk, Kola Division’s home turf, is being renovated and in spring 2022 will accommodate a branch of Norilsk Nickel Corporate University launched in early 2021. The new building will boast comfortable modern classrooms, computer rooms, a VR classroom, a lean manufacturing laboratory and a modern conference room to host corporate events for 90 people.

Talent pool

We continuously plan staff professional development and build a talent pool for leadership positions while also training and promoting pool members. This way we supply the Group companies with highly qualified managerial personnel.

In 2021, the Company continued to grow and train a pool of junior and mid-level managers at 11 sites of Norilsk and Kola Divisions.

We also kept expanding a pool of top managers. The reporting year saw 44 meetings of HR committees for key functional areas and Top 100 managers. The key focus was on hedging against the shortage of top managers, building a senior talent pool, assessing if the candidates are ready for promotion and identifying areas for development. Managers and members of the relevant talent pool can take part in training under special corporate programmes — Nornickel’s Leaders, Pursuing Efficiency, and I am HR.

In 2022, the Company plans to integrate talent pool creation and development projects at all levels into Nornickel’s talent management framework.

Career guidance and recruitment of young talent

Nornickel realises the importance of nurturing a new generation of employees and actively connects with young graduates, students and schoolchildren as part of its leadership, internship, and career guidance programmes designed to assist the Company in attracting the best talent.

We closely cooperate with 25 higher educational institutions across Russia.

Despite the remote work arrangement in 2021, our Head Office carried on with the internship programme. Top Moscowbased students were invited to take part in paid internships at the Company’s Moscow office. The programme enjoyed strong demand, with over 2,000 students applying for enrolment.

Nornickel places a strong emphasis on promoting engineering education in Russia, helping to boost interest in engineering careers among young people. In 2021, we supported CUP Technical and Metal CUP, Russian and international case competitions among students of technical universities. They challenged students to develop solutions to business cases dealing with Nornickel’s operations, giving them valuable insights into the Company’s business.

In 2021, we carried on with the Conquerors of the North programme now running online. Out of more than 2,000 applicants from Russia’s leading engineering universities, we selected 590 participants. An effective talent pool building instrument, the new programme became our maiden course to help young engineers develop skills necessary to work in production. By dealing with cases using applied problem solving methods, they gained an insight into real engineering challenges, while soft skill training was useful for those aiming for a successful career and outstanding results. After completing the programme, 168 trainees were recommended for internship and further employment at Nornickel.

Also, we run a number of career guidance initiatives for schoolchildren. They include Arctic.PRO R&D Winter School, Arctic Wave festival of R&D discoveries, IMake engineering marathon, a National Science Festival, School of Urban Competencies and the School Break educational project — all attended by over 29,500 schoolchildren annually.

Early career guidance for children

At the beginning of every school year, the Company provides all first graders (over 5,000 kids) within Nornickel’s footprint with a book that features exciting insights into jobs and professions relevant for the Company. “The Tale of How Metals Forged Cities” is the ultimate ABC of metals and mining. Capturing children’s attention with a vivid and eye-catching imagery, it illustrates Nornickel’s operations and explains to kids in a simple way what their parents do for a living. QR integration enables an illustrative and interactive presentation.

To complement the book, we have also created a cartoon series titled “Professor Nichrome’s Lessons”.

Combined, these educational materials will be used in career guidance work with young pupils by both primary school teachers and career guidance counsellors.